16th-century manuscript could rewrite australian history facts

The origins and purpose of artifacts are still disputed. Weird antenna on the seafloor - In the height of Cold War paranoia, an oceanographic research ship named USNS Eltanin made a rather peculiar discovery whilst scanning the antarctic seafloor. Wolfsegg Iron - The first impression you may have of this cube is that it looks unimpressive and is hardly a cube at all.

16th-century manuscript could rewrite australian history facts

Print The 15th Century Voynich manuscript is considered to be the most mysterious text ever uncovered as it has never been deciphered despite over a century of attempts to uncover its meaning and more than 25 different analyses from top minds around the world.

This has led some to claim that the Voynich manuscript is nothing more than an elaborate hoax. However, a new study published in the journal HerbalGram may provide a clue that could break the code of the enigmatic manuscript. The page book, which uses a cryptic language and numerous illustrations depicting astronomical, biological, cosmological, herbal and pharmaceutical themes, was discovered in by a Polish-American named Wilfrid M.

16th-century manuscript could rewrite australian history facts

While the manuscript appears to be written in an unknown language, latest finding supports the hypothesis that there are meaningful words and messages within the text.

An academic war has raged for years between those who think the manuscript contains a real language that could eventually be decoded, and those who think it was a clever forgery designed to dupe book collectors.

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Until now, the plants portrayed in the book — which are crudely drawn — have been unidentifiable. However, the latest study has found a link between illustrations of plants in the manuscript and depictions in 16 th century records from Mexico of plants native to Central America, suggesting a new origin for the text.

A plant illustration in the Voynich manuscript. Photo credit The most striking example was an illustration of a soap plant xiuhamolli in a Mexican book dated Arthur Tucker, co-director of the Claude E.

Theory of the Portuguese discovery of Australia - Wikipedia

Phillips Herbarium at Delaware State University, and Rexford Talbert, a retired information technology researcher at the US Department of Defense and NASA, connected a total of 37 of the plants, six animals and one mineral illustrated in the Voynich manuscript to 16th century species in the region that lies between Texas, California and Nicaragua.

On the basis of these similarities, the pair suggests that the manuscript came from the Central America, and may be written in an extinct dialect of the Mexican language Nahuatl.

Deciphering the names of these plants could therefore help crack the Voynich code. He thinks a careful forger could have made up plausible-looking plants.

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Tucker acknowledges that there is still a long way to go in proving that the Voynich manuscript is not a hoax, so while the latest study may bring us one step closer to discovering the truth, for now the manuscript retains its hidden secrets.In contemporary Australia, reports of textual and cartographic evidence, of varying significance, and occasionally artifacts are sometimes cited as likely to "rewrite" Australian History because they suggest a foreign presence in Australia.

The development of the theory of Portuguese discovery of Australia owes much to Melbourne lawyer Kenneth McIntyre's book, The Secret Discovery of Australia; Portuguese ventures years before iridis-photo-restoration.comre's book was reprinted in an abridged paperback edition in and again in and it was found on school history reading lists by the mids.

Jacki Weaver is a worthy recipient of the Raymond Longford award for lifetime commitment to acting, and is also right to lament the general lack of national enthusiasm for Australian-made films.

16th-century manuscript could rewrite australian history facts

A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history. The document. Kangaroo Drawing What Is Thinking History Images Kangaroos Drawings Of Prehistory Illuminated Manuscript 16th Century Year Old Forwards A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history.

A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history.

A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history.

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